A Tale of Two Cacti

Remembering back to last fall when I thought it would be a snap to learn the difference between our local Opuntia species. Definitely a case of the more you learn, the less you know. I’ll consider this a challenge to resume in the spring!

16 Comments

  1. memnona says:

    Beautiful done 😍

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Barb says:

      Thanks so much!

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Elaine B Hills says:

      Absolutely beautiful, well researched information. Can’t wait for the next installment, feel like I’m out there hiking with the artist!

      Like

      1. Thank you so so much Elaine! And thanks for following.

        Like

  2. peacefulbird says:

    For the next time you’re playing around with this, I’m curious about the juice and wondering how it might work as a dye or ink, how lightfast and colorfast it might be. I love learning things this way! What an amazing “text book” they would make! It is so generous of you to share them with us… Thank you!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. gaylamarie says:

    Barb, catching up with you and Roy. Thanks for invite and curious nature blog.

    Like

    1. Gay! Is that you?

      Like

  4. zentanglingdeb says:

    Barb, I love your posts!

    Like

    1. Thank you so so very much Debra! And a million thanks for following along.

      Like

  5. sgoodman56 says:

    I love how you did the insert. Everything is awesome.

    Like

    1. Oh how kind of you! I think far from perfect, but I’m learning so much!

      Like

  6. goodlifecp says:

    I’m so glad you chose this platform to share your work! I won’t have to worry about missing new posts. ❤️

    Your notation about the aeroles intrigued me. Is their purpose similar to the purpose of a human aerola? Reading about both, I found nothing similar other than the aerola is the area surrounding a nipple that has glands that secret oil to protect the nipple from drying out when nursing. The cactus aerola is a spot where hair, spines (which protects the cactus – the similarity), glochids, flowers, or branches arise.

    Like

    1. Delighted to have you follow my posts, Susan, and for such an intriguing question! I don’t know the answer exactly, but I shall investigate. You’ve certainly caused me to wonder! Thanks for the inspiration.

      Like

    2. Barb says:

      Oops …. Meant to thank you, Cass, for such an intriguing question about cacti areoles! I’ll have to look into it!

      Like

  7. blakdogart says:

    Thanks for sending your email, Barb! Love seeing your beautiful depictions of the natural worl you live in! A joyful journey I am happy to join!

    Like

    1. Thank you so much for the comments and for following along!

      Like

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